Are You There, G-d? It’s Me, Tamar

Posted on January 15th, 2018
Tamar Cohen for Fresh Ink for Teens


Judy Blume’s books teach us real-lessons about growing up.


Bildungsroman: the German word for a coming-of-age novel. A prime example of this? Judy Blume's “Are You There, G-d? It's Me, Margaret.” Beloved by angsty teens and middle-aged women’s book clubs alike, Judy Blume seems to have completely mastered the art of coming-of-age in fiction.

Growing up with an irrational fear of dogs, I found a sympathetic fellow in cynophobic Sheila, of Blume’s “Otherwise Known As Sheila the Great.” I know many classmates of all genders whose love of reading began with Blume’s the “Fudge” saga, and, of course, an entire mother-daughter book club's worth of girls who learned the emotional process of menstruation from Margaret and her friends.  

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Finding Positivity In A Negative World

Posted on January 1st, 2018
by: Sheila Levy for Fresh Ink for Teens


Everyone faces adversity at some point in life, so learning how to cope is extremely important.


“Dancing in the rain” — the phrase that kept coming to mind as I sat in a room filled with my closest friends. As the hours went by, eyes watered and voices cracked, we continued to think about those four words. Inspirational story after story, chills started running up and down my body as we spoke about the deceased. The group healing was helpful and allowed us to think about how we can dance in a world that is filled with rain; how can we have a positive perspective on life when all we see is the negative.


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Hannah Senesh

Posted on December 25th, 2017
BY JUDITH TYDOR BAUMEL for myjewishlearning.com


How this Hungarian Jew became a national heroine of Israel.


One of the more poignant songs included in many Holocaust memorial convocations held in Israel, is a short poem, set to music, known popularly as “Eli, Eli.” The four-line poem, actually entitled “Walking to Caesarea,” was written by one of the more mythological figures in contemporary Jewish and Israeli history, Hannah Senesh (Szenes), whose short life and death have propelled her into the pantheon of Zionist history.

Hannah Senesh was born in Budapest on July 17, 1921, to a wealthy, distinguished, and assimilated Hungarian Jewish family. Her father, Bela Senesh (1874-1929), who died when she was a child, had been a well-known writer and dramatist and her mother, Katharine, an elegant homemaker. Having been given a modern Hungarian education, Senesh was exposed to anti-Semitism during her high school years, propelling her to learn more about her Jewish origins. It was at that time that she discovered the Zionist movement, joining a Zionist youth movement and learning Hebrew in preparation for immigration to Palestine.

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How AIPAC’s High School Summit Expanded My Israel Advocacy

Posted on December 18th, 2017

Sruli Fruchter for Fresh Ink for Teens



The conference taught me how to broaden my political activism.



At the beginning of junior year, I became a fellow for Write On For Israel, a program that uses the lens of journalism to educate students on how to become pro-Israel advocates. Not only has the program given me a greater understanding of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict through monthly seminars, but I recently had the opportunity to represent Write On at the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee’s (AIPAC) High School Summit.


I felt nervous attending such an important event; after all, the goal of AIPAC is to maintain and strengthen the U.S-Israeli relationship through direct involvement in America’s political process. But Write On has given me a nuanced understanding of the conflict, and taught me to sift through the facts and the fallacies to develop my perspectives on Israel, so I felt ready.


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The Day I Left Him

Posted on December 11th, 2017
From Jerusalem U


This video is part of a series titled “Hear Me Roar,” promoting Jewish values and showing the world that you can find a bright spark of goodness in any person.


Young, beautiful Zo Flamenbaum found herself stuck in an unhealthy codependent relationship. She hated how he treated her, how he treated her friends, how she felt around him. But she still couldn’t leave. This was not run-of-the-mill boyfriend girlfriend stuff. In this video, she talks about the courage it took for her to walk away from an emotional dependency and take back her life after so long. 

In her video, Zo talks about dealing with dependency, bad relationships, depression and meds and finding the bravery to face how disconnected she was from herself. 

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